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20131102
20131102
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CSPAN
Nov 2, 2013 10:00am EDT
, intelligence officials testify on national security agency surveillance programs followed by a hearing onthe washington -- shooting -- the shooting at the washington naval yard. next, the house intelligence onmittee hearing testimony the national security agency intelligence programs in the u.s. and abroad. witnesses included national intelligence agency director james clapper and homeland security department officials. this hearing is two-and-a-half hours. >> i remind all guests that i will only accept civil the koran and only those recognized to speak will be allowed to speak andhe core him --decorum only those recognized to speak will be allowed to speak. i would like to recognize our first panel today. director of national intelligence james clapper james clapper,, deputy attorney the deputyes cole, director of the nsa, chris inglis. we will move immediately into the second panel of non- governmental experts knowledgeable on fisa issues. we will discuss possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled by the department of justice. i hope all of our witnesses will give clea
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2013 12:00am EDT
maximized its profits. many national security experts long argued that the security we have to ask whether the system is fundment tally flawed. we should also be mindful for many years both congress and the federal agencies were concerned about the backlog of security clearance applications which grew larger after 9/11. we need to make sure that investigators do not feel pressured to sacrifice quality for speed. many of heard me say that almost everything i do i know i can do better. same is true, i think, for all of us, and most federal programs. it is in that spirit we convened today's hearing. our primary purpose is to learn what we're doing right in the security process, do more of that, while also learning how we can improve it. we have many questions to ask. here's some of them. are we looking at the risk factors in attempting to identify people who should not be trusted with a clearance or who should do serious harm for our government and our country? what important information do background checks miss in the current system which relies heavily on self-reporting by the individuals applying for a clearance? once a clearance is granted, what events should trigger a re-examination of suitability to retai
CSPAN
Nov 2, 2013 12:00pm EDT
versus the national security agency taking the standard to the court. would that make sense? would that be too cumbersome? would that not be walkable? -- workable? >> the reason the standard is used in our system is to -- as for police authors to determine whether they can stop and frisk somebody. they have to have reasonable, articulable suspicion that that person is engaged in some sort of activity that could be illegal. and that is a decision that is made by the cop on the street at the time. it is meant to be a relatively low standard, but a protective standard to allow them to do this for public safety. so we are in an area where we are applying it in an area where there is not any constitutional protection. we are applying it in a way that i think needs to be nimble and needs to be consigned to the people who are actually applying it day-to-day. >> mr. chairman, can i add one additional -- >> sure. >> we have a vote at 5:00, and it is important that we get to that panel. >> i think most of the analogies to the criminal court process are really not on point. for the reason that whe
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3